Author Archive for phayward

NEWS OF THE WEEK

Gordon Greenberg (Guys and Dolls) will direct the first major London revival of Cy Coleman, Michael Stewart and Mark Bramble’s Tony Award-winning musical “Barnum” with choreography by Rebecca Howell, design by Paul Farnsworth and musical direction by Alex Parker, will play at the Menier Chocolate Factory from 5th December to 3rd March, with previews from 25th November. Really Useful Group is to partner with Shanghai Media Group Live in a new initiative pairing the UK and the Chinese musical theatre industry and have announced the first Chinese language and Chinese produced staging of the composer’s “Tell Me on a Sunday”. With Neil Eckersley’s Speckulation Entertainment allegedly in financial difficulties leading to the curtailment of the “Wonderland” tour, its been announced that their next production a tour of of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s “Bring It On” has been put on ice. Stephen Sondheim will be in London to talk “FOLLIES” at the National Theatre on 22nd August. Andrew Lloyd Webber’s “STARLIGHT EXPRESS” is to make a return to London  in  three concert-style workshop performances at The Other Palace from 14th-16th September. Aaron Sidwell (Grey Gardens, American Idiot, Loserville) will play Fiyero on the forthcoming major UK and Ireland tour of “WICKED” across all 2018 dates. U.S.-based musical theatre stars Kevin Hack and Jenna Burns lead the triple threat cast of the 60th-anniversary production of “WEST SIDE STORY”, which premiered in Germany and is now playing in Paranaque City, The Philippines before touring across Asia. X Factor’s Stevi Ritchie and Stacey Franks are to star in the musical “THE SWORD AND THE DOPE” at the Waterloo East Theatre from 5th Sept to 1st Oct.

Follies – the jewel in Sondheim’s crown – ahead of the NT revival

The National Theatre is about to present its version of Stephen Sondheim’s Follies – one of the most awaited theatrical events of the year.  To some, Follies is one of the most assessable Sondheim scores being one that is part a tribute of the great American composers that have gone before him.  It is not difficult to find the Irving Berlin influence or the Gershwin or the Romberg.  You are meant to recognise them, it makes you, the audience, become part of the celebration of the past.  But Sondheim’s score, perhaps his best, is far more than a set of pastiche numbers, it goes far further than that, it presents some of the best theatre songs ever written.  

The premise of the show is simple, a reunion in 1971 of cast members of Ziegfeld like revues some 30 or so years after the last was presented.  In fact it was inspired by an actual Ziegfeld Follies reunion that had been reported on in the New Yorker.  The theatre where the party is being held is being demolished but before it is, it is time to revisit the ghosts that inhabit the place and the ghosts that still inhabit those who were in the revues together with the dreams of youth and the reality of age. 

The core of Follies is rather intimate.  Two couples, the wives ex chorus girls and their husbands, youthful friends who had wooed the girls and had since gone their own ways in very different life styles.  The problem being that one of the girls always loved the other boy.  After years apart the desperation of the situation comes into the open at the night of the reunion in a mix of truth and fantasy.

This intimate story, fashioned by James Goldman, became in the hands of Harold Prince, who directed and was involved in its conception, a physically large show glorifying the past and mixing fact and fiction.  Remember this was in the days in the early seventies when theatrical dreams could become reality and originality was a joy, a time before the accountant and multi producers were needed to produce a show.  However, Follies took its time in getting to the stage.  Its first conception was as called The Girls Upstairs which was to have been a mystery musical but gradually the themes expanded to become the Follies we know today.

Follies opened on Broadway on 4 April 1971 and ran for 522 performances.  Not quite the hit it should have been.  Virtually all the original cast took off to Los Angeles where it played the Shubert Theatre (and where I first saw it).  It went nowhere else.  It was a show that could boast a wonderful score, sets of perfection by Boris Aronson and stunning costumes by Florence Klotz.  Prince’s direction was enhanced by the choreography of Michael Bennett which mingled vaudeville and Broadway – has there ever been a more perfectly staged number than the Mirror dance?  The problem was that Follies is not a comfortable show, it is adult, it has leading characters that are not easy to warm to and it ends in what is close to a nightmare.  James Goldman’s book was blamed for the show’s relative failure – totally unfair when you get close to the intimate core of the show.

When Follies eventually arrived in London under the Cameron Macintosh banner.  Macintosh ordered a revisit to the plot and a new song appeared.  The changes were not radical but tried to make the couples more in tune with the audience.  It made little difference in the long run and now revivals go back to the original.  The London run was longer than the Broadway one but it was not a show to put on the road and it has now only reappeared mainly in Concert form.  There was a successful brave production on the small South London’s Landor stage which allowed Goldman’s book to shine and make the characters more accessible. 

What the National Theatre production has to offer we await to see.  What itself is a revisit to the past and the uncomfortable reality of the present has become a precious piece itself and that is being revisited – welcome to the reunion.  

Rexton S Bunnett                                                     Illustrations from the Overtures Archive

Simply Heaven features on this week’s Musical Theatre Melodies

The next “Musical Theatre Melodies” broadcast on 96.5 FM on Tuesday, 22nd August will feature a 60th Anniversary tribute to David Martin and Langston Hughes’ Simply Heavenly, (based on the novel “Simple Takes a Wife” and other stories by Langston Hughes), from the 1957 original Broadway cast recording starring Melvin Stewart, Marilyn Berry, Claudia Mcneil, John Bouie, Anna English, Brownie McGhee and Duke Willlams; plus additional songs from the 2005 London cast recording starring Rhashan Stone, Allyson Brown, Ruby Turner, Clive Rowe and Nicola Hughes. This will be introduced (via Skype) from New York-based theatre critic and Internet columnist Peter Filichia.

The broadcast will go “to air” between 9 – 11 p.m. EST local Melbourne time; (= 12 noon – 2 p.m. BST in Britain; = 11 p.m. – 1 a.m. NZST; = 7 – 9 a.m. EDT New York time; = 4 – 6 a.m. PDT Los Angeles time.) For those listening in via the Internet on 96.5 Inner FM’s website the webpage link for the Inner FM Web Radio player is  http://right-click.com.au/rcPlayer/index.php?c=innerfm or go to the Inner FM homepage at www.innerfm.org.au and follow the links.

Barbara Cook – a personal good-bye – Rex Bunnett reflects

Barbara Cook has died just before reaching the age of ninety.  For many, like me, it seems a very personal loss.  There are thousands of wonderful tributes out there and every aspect of her career and private life have been recounted in detail.  And, there is her own account of her life in the book Then and Now which was published last year.

Of the post war Broadway singing actors she without doubt was one of the most significant – certainly for her part in the golden age of the Broadway Musical – for that alone she will never be forgotten.  One simply has to think of three shows: Candide, The Music Man and She Loves Me to recognise her place in Musical Theatre history, and, of course, there were many more shows in which she starred.

Unfortunately she did not perform a book show in London but she did perform here in cabaret and in her theatrical one woman shows.  Her first appearance here was at a long lost venue called Country Cousins set in World’s End (the less salubrious end of Chelsea).  This courageous early London cabaret venue, remembered also for its dubious food, brought to London the likes of Cook.  It was there that I first saw her ‘live’ and I’ll never forget her singing ‘Ice cream’ from She Loves Me which brought tears of joy.  Her wonderful Marion in The Music Man singing ‘My White Knight’ still causes tingles down my back.

Her gradual move to cabaret was enhanced with her instinctive understanding of the importance of the lyric, a gift she shared with the great Mable Mercer.  Barbara Cook brought new life to many a song.  Age obviously caught up with her but she commanded a stage right up to the end.  Although by the end she may not have been able to reach the high notes of ‘Ice cream’ she made up of that in her immaculate style and lyrical warmth.

Barbara Cook is hopefully sleeping happily in the knowledge that she left so much love.

My last thoughts are simply ‘Goodnight MY Someone’.

RSB

CoCo the musical – a recording rarity in the Collection

Coco is remembered more for its star than the show itself.  The star, of course, was Katherine Hepburn (although the still alive Coco Chanel on whose life the musical is based may have mistakenly thought it was that other Hepburn, Audrey.  Other that THE star it had what looks like a solid pedigree: book and lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner, music by Andre Previn, musical numbers and fashion sequence staged by Michael Bennett with sets and costumes by Cecil Beaton (who also did the Coco art-work).

It opened on Broadway on 18 December 1969 and was recorded on 8 January the following year – the Christmas and New Year celebrations ruined the traditional fist Sunday after opening recording date. The issue was rushed out, the sleeves having been already printed.  The sleeve note states: ‘refer to label for exact sequence.  Selections accurate as of 12/ 9/69’ (9 December).

When Miss Hepburn received her rushed copy she did not like what she heard – after all she was not the strongest singer – and stopped the album issue for it to be re-mixed and ‘improved’ and re-issued.  That was done.  However, some copies of the original issue managed find their way to other people.  

How do you know if you have the ‘original’?   On the plastic next to the label there is a hand etched number – for this it is: LPS 76957 – 513 on the A Side and LPS 76958 – 5 on the B Side.  The issue sold in the shops was etched: LPS 76957 on the A Side – 6 and LPS 76958 – 6 on the B Side.

RSB                                                           Illustrations from the Overtures Collections

Broadway Musicals – the ones that London has yet to see

Recently Mark Shenton, the Stage critic and Musical Theatre show buff came up with ten Broadway Shows he would like to see professionally produced in London.

The ten were as follows:

The Act – the 1977 Kander & Ebb vehicle for Liza Minelli.

Woman of the Year – the 1981 Kander & Ebb vehicle for Lauren Bacall.

The Will Rogers Follies – the 1991 Coleman, Comden & Green’s tribute to the great American vaudeville and radio artist.

The Boy From Oz – the 1998 Australian tribute to Peter Allen that played Broadway in 2003 starring Hugh Jackman.

Legs Diamond – the 1988 Peter Allen flop Musical.

Catch Me if you Can – the 2011 almost ran based on the film of the same name.

The Last Ship – the 2014 Sting flop that brought back memories of Lionel Bart’s Maggie May.

The Bridges of Madison County – the 2014 Jason Robert Brown award winning show based on Robert James Waller’s successful book that was also filmed.

Far From Heaven – the 2013 Off Broadway Scott Frankel & Michael Korie show.

The Tap Dance Kid – the 1983 Henry Kreiger flop starring the young Savion Glover

For Mark’s reasons for these 10, go to The Stage page:

https://www.thestage.co.uk/opinion/2017/mark-shentons-top-10-musicals-yet-to-be-seen-in-london/?login_to=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.thestage.co.uk%2Faccounts%2Fusers%2Fsign_up.popup

While not disagreeing with Mark’s suggestions we have come up with a further ten.  And, we would love to hear of other people’s ideas.  Producers should take note as there is no doubt that lingering out there are potential London hits. 

Let us know by clicking here and adding your suggestions – http://overtures.org.uk/?page_id=67

Our further ten, listed in no particular order, are:

 

Redhead – a 1959 murder mystery multi Tony award winning show set in London in Jack the Ripper time set in a wax works.  Written by Arthur Hague and Dorothy Fields for Gwen Verdon.   It is very much a dance show and the original choreography was by Bob Fosse.

 

Walking Happy – seen in 1966 and based on the ever popular play Hobson’s Choice.   This became a vehicle for Norman Wisdom on Broadway, although not actually written with him in mind.  The score is by Sammy Cahn and James Van Heusen and has plenty of openings for a choreographer.

Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder? – A more recent Broadway show, this musical comedy by Robert L Freedman and Steven Lutvah is based on the book that inspired the film Kind Hearts and Coronets and the original novel by Roy Horniman.  It was Tony winning and had respectable run.

  

The Girl Who Came to Supper – something for the National to think about!  A Noel Coward score to a Terrance Rattigan story (the Prince and the Showgirl) is crying out for a London production.  Not a great hit on Broadway when produced in the sixties but why not now? 

The Golden Apple – a 1954 cult ‘handle with care’ piece that requires a director with ’inspiration’.  It originally caused a stir Off-Broadway but an up-town transfer was not a success.  Recently revived in New York as a part of the Encore season.

Li’l Abner – a colourful, funny dance packed show seen in 1958 and later filmed using the Broadway production as its base.  The inspiration was a long running newspaper Comic Strip with a score by Gene de Paul and Johnny Mercer.

  

New Girl in Town – 1958 and subject to a recent article (use the search button to read it).  I think now we are ready for an adult musical – especially one that can home in on dance. 

Ben Franklin in Paris – 1964 show by Sidney Michaels and Mark Sandrich Jr (includes a couple of songs written by Jerry Herman) set at the same time as Hamilton and about another founding father.  However, this is told in a far more traditional Broadway way.  Perhaps a fringe venue would be a good starting point.

Carmelina – 1979 – based on the movie Buena Sera Mrs Campbell (available on DVD in Spain) about a girl with three guys believing they are her father and set in a Mediterranean setting.   However, it doesn’t have a score by ABBA just a delightful one by Alan Jay Lerner and Burton Lane.

 

Jelly’s Last Jam – a strong 1992 Broadway hit based on the songs and story of Jerry Roll Morton it could be another Dreamgirls in waiting.  This piece boldly talks about race and colour within the creole community ‘down south’. 

RSB                                                                                 Illustrations from the Overtures archive

 

This week’s news headlines

Stephen Sondheim will be in London to talk “FOLLIES” at the National Theatre on 22nd August. Andrew Lloyd Webber’s “STARLIGHT EXPRESS” is to make a return to London  in  three concert-style workshop performances at The Other Palace from 14th-16th September. Aaron Sidwell (Grey Gardens, American Idiot, Loserville) will play Fiyero on the forthcoming major UK and Ireland tour of “WICKED” across all 2018 dates. U.S.-based musical theatre stars Kevin Hack and Jenna Burns lead the triple threat cast of the 60th-anniversary production of “WEST SIDE STORY”, which premiered in Germany and is now playing in Paranaque City, The Philippines before touring across Asia. X Factor’s Stevi Ritchie and Stacey Franks are to star in the musical “THE SWORD AND THE DOPE” at the Waterloo East Theatre from 5th Sept to 1st Oct. Craig Revel Horwood is taking over from Miranda Hart as  Miss Hannigan in “ANNIE” the Musical at the Piccadilly Theatre from 18th Sept to 20th Nov when he begins rehearsals for Snow White at Southampton’s Mayflower. The KING’S HEAD THEATRE on Upper Street has announced plans to move to a major new venue with significantly more facilities by late 2018 and will see the creation of a 250-seat subterranean auditorium and an 85-seat studio, along with a dedicated bar and foyer area, whilst he existing venue will be transformed into dining space for the currently adjoined pub. While the brand new space is built, the King’s Head Theatre will move to a temporary home which has been designed to match the capacity and specifications of the current King’s Head Theatre, in the current John Salt Bar at 131 Upper Street. The full cast has been announced for Hope Mill Theatre’s production of the award-winning Broadway musical “PIPPIN” – Mairi Barclay as Fastrada and Berthe, Jonathan Carlton as Pippin, Bradley Judge as Lewis, Tessa Kadler as Catherine, Rhidian Marc as Charles and Genevieve Nicole as the Leading Player. They will be joined by Olivia Faulkner, Andrew Halliday, Scott Hayward and Ellie Seaton as The Company of Players.

Sixty years ago it was Simply Heaven on Broadway

Simply Heavenly opened Off-Broadway on 21 May 1957 at the 85th Playhouse.  However, after 44 performances, the theatre was closed by the New York Fire Department who condemned the building as being a fire hazard.  A new home had to be found and a downtown Broadway house was chosen.  This was the Playhouse Theatre (the theatre name is a co-incidence, it was on West 48th Street opposite where the Cort Theatre is now) on 20 August 1957 with a programme that high-lighted the New York Fire Commissioner’s Fire Notice showing this was a safe venue. 

It achieved 62 performances after which it re-opened, yet again, Off-Broadway on 8 November at the Renata Theatre where it ran a further 63 performances.  Simply Heavenly’s total New York run was 169 performances.  In 1959 it was seen on American television’s Play of the Week series in an adaptation that featured most of the original cast.

Simply Heavenly crossed the Atlantic and on 15 April 1958, the European premiers took place at the Manchester Palace where it played for two weeks.  The original British production brought over two of the American stars, Melvin Stewart as Simple and John Bouie as Melon.  It also starred Bertice Reading who eventually made her home in Britain.

On 20 May 1958 Simply Heavenly opened in London at the Adelphi Theatre as ‘a new all-Negro Musical’ and not the norm ‘a new musical comedy’ as it had been billed in New York.  There was just one cast change – the policewoman originally played in Manchester by Neville Crabbe was replaced in London by Harry Baird. 

It ran just 16 performances under the production hat of Laurence Harvey and Jack Hylton.  Laurence Harvey was, at the time, one Britain’s hottest stars and was trying his hand at directing.  Harvey, having been taken with the show, persuaded Jack Hylton to let him direct the English production of Simply Heavenly.  Six years later Harvey was to star in Jack Hylton’s production of Camelot.

Simply Heavenly was successfully revived in March 2003 at the Young Vic and was seen again in the West End in October 2004 at the Trafalgar Theatre where it played through to February 2005.

Simply Heavenly is based on Simple takes a Wife and other ‘Simple’ stories by the great black author and poet Langston Hughes.  Hughes’ previous musical theatre credits included two Broadway operas: Street Scene (1947) with music by Kurt Weill and the far less successful The Barrier, which played 4 performances on Broadway in 1950.  It was Hughes’ idea to turn his Simple stories into a musical and not only did he provide the book but also the lyrics to the show which he kept firmly based in Harlem and in particular, Paddy’s Bar, where Jess Simple is a frequent customer.  Simple is an honest easy-going married man but he is not in love with his wife and is saving up for a divorce so he can marry his new love Joyce Lane.  And that is the simple back-ground of the story.

The original recording on Long Play was also released in Britain and since it has been remastered and issued twice on CD.  Firstly by Sepia in London and more recently Sony’s Masterworks Broadway series.               

Rexton S Bunnett                                                                                             Illustrations from the Overtures Archive

Musical Theatre Melodies features Romberg’s MAYTIME

The next “Musical Theatre Melodies” broadcast on 96.5 FM on Tuesday, 15th August will feature a Centenary tribute to Sigmund Romberg and Rida Johnson Young’s Maytime:

Featuring the 2005 Ohio Light Opera cast recording starring Joshua Kohl, Robin De Leon, Tyler Nelson, Brian Tanner, Sarah Walker, Danielle McCormick, Shannon Langman and Grant Knox. Also, the broadcast will feature orchestral selections from Romberg’s Her Soldier Boy (1917) played by the Eastman-Dryden Orchestra conducted by Donald Hunsberger.

The broadcast will go “to air” between 9 – 11 p.m. EST local Melbourne time; (= 12 noon – 2 p.m. BST in Britain; = 11 p.m. – 1 a.m. NZST; = 7 – 9 a.m. EDT New York time; = 4 – 6 a.m. PDT Los Angeles time.) For those listening in via the Internet on 96.5 Inner FM’s website the webpage link for the Inner FM Web Radio player is  http://right-click.com.au/rcPlayer/index.php?c=innerfm or go to the Inner FM homepage at www.innerfm.org.au and follow the links.
ILLUSTRATIONS FROM THE OVERTURES ARCHIVES

Ahead of London’s revival we look back at the original Salad Days

During the early fifties Bristol’s Theatre Royal repertory company was in vibrant mood, a number of their excellent productions having had successful transfers to London.  The company had been built by director Denis Carey and included Julian Slade, a young university graduate.  Slade became the resident musical director and composer of incidental music for their plays which included a well-received production of Two Gentlemen of Verona.  He had also written the score for a musical version of Sheridan’s The Duenna with a cast that included Patricia Routledge and Joan Plowright, and which opened at the Westminster theatre on 28 July 1954, where it was a success.  Julian had previously collaborated with Dorothy Reynolds, one of the actresses in the company, on two original Christmas shows.

The success of the Christmas shows led Denis Carey to present a light summer production to run for a three week season in Bristol between two rather heavyweight plays.  The team of Slade and Reynolds thought ‘summer’ and worked up a light-hearted romp in revuesical style, suitable for the season, and built around the talents of the company, not all of whom were good or even trained singers.  The result was Salad Days, named after a Shakespeare quote.

The show opened on 1 June 1954 and was such a critical success and crowd pleaser that London producers were invited to Bristol.  And, two agreed it should come to town together with those cast members who were able to do the transfer.  So, two months after it had premiered in Bristol and after a brief try-out in Brighton, Salad Days opened on 5 August 1954 at the Vaudeville Theatre in London wher it remained until 1960 when it closed after a run of 2283 performances.

Salad Days is, on the face of it, a piece of fluff but its simplicity hides an extremely well formed musical show with infectious songs that are easy to sing.  The accompaniment was provided by just two pianos, one played for much of the run by Slade himself.

The show is built around the tale of a magic piano, one that can make people dance.  Timothy and Jane have just left university and are having to find their way in the world with the help (or hindrance) of their respective families.  They decide to marry secretly for they are fond of each other and plan to fall in love later.  Their lack of income is miraculously solved for the summer when a tramp offers them £7 a week to look after Minnie, his piano, a task in which they are aided by Troppo, a mute with amusing charm, who also appears on the scene.

And then the problems start.  Tim’s parents are hoping to get him a good job through one of his four uncles (there are five actually but the last is never mentioned) and then the couple manage to lose the piano that has set London dancing, and is now wanted by the police.  Tim and Jane end up on a flying saucer (yes, one of the uncles has a flying saucer, who of course turns out to be the unmentioned uncle!) returning with the piano to reclaim it.

Eleanor Drew, one of the few trained singers in the cast, played Jane and Timothy was John Warner.  Co-writer Dorothy Reynolds played, as many of the cast did, a number of roles including Asphinxia, a cabaret artist and seductress who was introduced by Eric Port as the night club manager.

Salad Days has never really disappeared, having been revived regularly – four of which had West end showings.  Its place in musical history is assured, not only because of its long run, but the fact that this was the first show seen by a young Cameron Mackintosh and which sparked off his lifelong interest in the form.

There was a brief New York showing but, not surprisingly, it was ‘not their cup of tea’.  However, New Zealand, Australia and South Africa took it to their hearts.

A revival can be seen at the Union Theatre until 9 September.

RSB                                                                                                                        Illustrations from the Overtures Archive 

News updates – 7th August

X Factor’s Stevi Ritchie and Stacey Franks are to star in the musical “THE SWORD AND THE DOPE” at the Waterloo East Theatre from 5th Sept to 1st Oct. Craig Revel Horwood is taking over from Miranda Hart as  Miss Hannigan in “ANNIE” the Musical at the Piccadilly Theatre from 18th Sept to 20th Nov when he begins rehearsals for Snow White at Southampton’s Mayflower. The KING’S HEAD THEATRE on Upper Street has announced plans to move to a major new venue with significantly more facilities by late 2018 and will see the creation of a 250-seat subterranean auditorium and an 85-seat studio, along with a dedicated bar and foyer area, whilst he existing venue will be transformed into dining space for the currently adjoined pub. While the brand new space is built, the King’s Head Theatre will move to a temporary home which has been designed to match the capacity and specifications of the current King’s Head Theatre, in the current John Salt Bar at 131 Upper Street. The full cast has been announced for Hope Mill Theatre’s production of the award-winning Broadway musical “PIPPIN” – Mairi Barclay as Fastrada and Berthe, Jonathan Carlton as Pippin, Bradley Judge as Lewis, Tessa Kadler as Catherine, Rhidian Marc as Charles and Genevieve Nicole as the Leading Player. They will be joined by Olivia Faulkner, Andrew Halliday, Scott Hayward and Ellie Seaton as The Company of Players. The tour of  “WONDERLAND” the musical due to call  at Wolverhampton Grand Theatre has  been cancelled with immediate effect as have some performances scheduled at Swansea this week  and the remaining tour dates of the Frank Wildhorn musical at theatres in Richmond and Bournemouth have also been cancelled. Tony Award-nominated actor Kelsey Grammer is making his West End debut in the London Premiere of the American musical “BIG FISH”, directed by Nigel Harman, co-starring Jamie Muscato and Matt Seadon-Young, which is  set to begin performances at The Other Palace on November 1st  through to December 31st, 2017, featuring a revised book and score from John August and Andrew Lippa. The eagerly anticipated “MEAN GIRLS” stage musical has found its cast, premiering at Washington, D.C.’s National Theatre in a pre-Broadway fall engagement set to run Oct. 31-Dec. 3 it is expected to bounce directly into a spring Broadway berth, making it eligible for consideration for the 2018 Tony Awards.

Cyrano De Bergerac features on Musical Theatre Melodies this week

The next “Musical Theatre Melodies” broadcast on 96.5 FM on Tuesday, 8th August will feature Frank Wildhorn and Leslie Bricusse’s Cyrano de Bergerac, (based on the play by Edmond Rostand), from the 2004 U.S. concept album starring Douglas Sills, Linda Eder and Rob Evan, with Brian d’Arcy James, Allen Fitzpatrick, Kevin Ligon and Douglas Storm. There will be a “live” introduction to the musical  from the award-winning composer/lyricist and librettist* – Leslie Bricusse.


The broadcast will go “to air” between 9 – 11 p.m. EST local Melbourne time; (= 12 noon – 2 p.m. BST in Britain; = 11 p.m. – 1 a.m. NZST; = 7 – 9 a.m. EDT New York time; = 4 – 6 a.m. PDT Los Angeles time.) For those listening in via the Internet on 96.5 Inner FM’s website the webpage link for the Inner FM Web Radio player is  http://right-click.com.au/rcPlayer/index.php?c=innerfm or go to the Inner FM homepage at www.innerfm.org.au and follow the links.
ILLUSTRATIONS FROM THE OVERTURES ARCHIVES